Food Writers Don’t Seem to Get Respect, Even in Hong Kong

As television networks become less and less interesting, I am finding other means of entertainment that I never knew existed. One is the television programs from Hong Kong which are broadcast on the TVB channel. They are usually a one-time program of about 20 to 30 episodes which are broadcast and later distributed on DVD’s or on the Internet. Of course the programs later distributed come with English subtitles or else I would not be able to understand them (even Mandarin speakers have to have Chinese subtitles in order to follow what is happening).

One can gain a surprising amount of food knowledge through the programs, although this is usually done as a means to develop the program plot. In The Rippling Blossom the entire plot is built around Japanese food, which the main characters import to Hong Kong through competing Japanese restaurants. I am mentioning the show as a backdrop, which can be viewed for free at this web site:

https://www.viki.com/explore?country=hong-kong .

I have checked the site and there are no strings attached except that they show ads in the middle of the episodes. Be sure to turn on the English subtitles, though, through the settings icon in the lower right part of the window.

One of my favorite parts of the show is where Keung Keung, a young food writer who specializes in Japanese food, comes to live with the Yu family (their two sons end up operating rival Japanese restaurants). At her first family meal with them Keung Keung is served some dishes but begins to complain about them making such statements as “this is too salty,” and “this does not taste right.” She definitely does not mean this as an insult but out of habit probably said it out loud as she would do when visiting restaurants which she wanted to review. Chi-ying, one of the sons who later becomes Keung Keung’s boyfriend instinctively says to her, “Why do you criticize a family meal?” Keung Keung, not really embarrassed but at the same time not trying to be snooty, replied “I can’t help it. I have sensitive taste buds!” While not condoning her actions, I do understand how she feels.

One of the jokes of the program is that the family’s name “Yu” has the same pronunciation as the word meaning fish, and the sons deal with fish every day as their profession.

Many commenters on forums about this program indicate that they cannot watch any of the episodes without getting hungry for sushi or the other Japanese food shown in the program. The program does show the amount of effort that goes into really good sushi. I think it is helpful when visiting high end sushi restaurants and realizing what really goes into the food they are serving.

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